Kings Island Terrier Attributes

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Kings Island Terrier The Kings Island Terrier originated in Europe in present day Slovakia. This breed traces its origins to the valley between the Tatra and Ore Mountain ranges in the vicinity of Gerlach Peak. The Kings Island Terrier started to breed true in the mid 1800’s when the farmers needed a dog that had the speed, endurance, cunning and desire to run down a fox, and even chase it into dens or caves. While these terriers have webbed feet, they are not accomplished swimmers, usually shying away from water deeper than their shoulders. Their thin narrow chests coupled with legs long for their body size allow for them to run over fields, plains, and through grasses over their heads. They mimic the fox by springing forward with all four legs in unison to see over the grasses and yet still moving forward through them at a smart pace. Their ears belie the terrier in them. Then can pin their ears flat against the back of their necks to hear behind them while running and when chasing quarry into dens. The Kings Island Terrier, although it does have a long braying bark, prefers to communicate through a series of high pitched sounds, scarcely moving its mouth. Their jowls are still together but there is a small pencil sized gap at the front of the mouth. The sound appears to come out the sides of their mouth through the closed jowls. The sound is akin to a high pitched radio frequency. They also have a rambling yodel used primarily inside to bring attention to themselves and not for warning. The Kings Island Terrier uses the long braying bark, nearly a howl when it is alerting a warning. When properly socialized these terriers are good with children and other animals. Because of their hunting instincts they can appear dog aggressive because their interactive play with their tails held high, usually involves vocalizations. At first it may seem like a growl, but in fact it is part of a playful posture enticing its playmate, human or canine, to engage it in a game of chase. Although the Kings Island Terrier will retrieve a tennis ball on occasion, it prefers to chase other dogs, while they are retrieving a tennis ball. They are more interested in the chase than focusing on the object to be retrieved. While playing with other dogs or humans it is very common for them to use their mouth. You will often feel their teeth, but they are not biting you, they are playing with their mouth open, may even nibble on your ear or hair, all without drawing blood. You can even put your hand in their mouth while playing and they will not bite down. This is all after the dog has been properly socialized. Do not try this with any dog that has not been properly socialized with other animals or humans. These terriers have several speeds at which they run. When they are playing with other dogs they will match their speed to those around them, but don’t be fooled. There are few dogs that can actually catch them. When running at top speed their bodies stretch out and they get very low to the ground, similar to greyhounds, though not as fast. Their preferred terrain is the woods where they can reach full speed darting down narrow trails and in between saplings. They can change direction at full speed, come to a full stop instantaneously, and leap onto and over things in excess of six feet high. From a stationary start standing below and abreast of a 5 foot terrace they can leap, turn and land on the terrace with their legs straight, as if no energy was expended to make the jump. When at play, either being chased by other dogs, or simply running for exercise, they will run in a figure eight, leaning into the turns like a motorcycle racer so that they can maintain their momentum and speed or actually accelerate through the turns. They can easily leap 12-15 feet getting about 3 feet off the ground. They are effortless runners and when the temperatures are in the lower 50’s never seem to tire or pant. These dogs range in
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  Kings Island Terrier The Kings Island Terrier srcinated in Europe in present day Slovakia. This breed traces itssrcins to the valley between the Tatra and Ore Mountain ranges in the vicinity of Gerlach Peak.The Kings Island Terrier started to breed true in the mid 1800’s when the farmers needed a dogthat had the speed, endurance, cunning and desire to run down a fox, and even chase it into densor caves. While these terriers have webbed feet, they are not accomplished swimmers, usuallyshying away from water deeper than their shoulders. Their thin narrow chests coupled with legslong for their body size allow for them to run over fields, plains, and through grasses over their heads. They mimic the fox by springing forward with all four legs in unison to see over thegrasses and yet still moving forward through them at a smart pace. Their ears belie the terrier inthem. Then can pin their ears flat against the back of their necks to hear behind them whilerunning and when chasing quarry into dens.  The Kings Island Terrier, although it does have a long braying bark, prefers to communicatethrough a series of high pitched sounds, scarcely moving its mouth. Their jowls are still together  but there is a small pencil sized gap at the front of the mouth. The sound appears to come out thesides of their mouth through the closed jowls. The sound is akin to a high pitched radiofrequency.They also have a rambling yodel used primarily inside to bring attention to themselves and notfor warning. The Kings Island Terrier uses the long braying bark, nearly a howl when it isalerting a warning.When properly socialized these terriers are good with children and other animals. Because of their hunting instincts they can appear dog aggressive because their interactive play with their tails held high, usually involves vocalizations. At first it may seem like a growl, but in fact it is part of a playful posture enticing its playmate, human or canine, to engage it in a game of chase.Although the Kings Island Terrier will retrieve a tennis ball on occasion, it prefers to chase other dogs, while they are retrieving a tennis ball. They are more interested in the chase than focusingon the object to be retrieved. While playing with other dogs or humans it is very common for them to use their mouth. You will often feel their teeth, but they are not biting you, they are playing with their mouth open, may even nibble on your ear or hair, all without drawing blood.You can even put your hand in their mouth while playing and they will not bite down. This is allafter the dog has been properly socialized. Do not try this with any dog that has not been properly socialized with other animals or humans.  These terriers have several speeds at which they run. When they are playing with other dogsthey will match their speed to those around them, but don’t be fooled. There are few dogs thatcan actually catch them. When running at top speed their bodies stretch out and they get verylow to the ground, similar to greyhounds, though not as fast. Their preferred terrain is the woodswhere they can reach full speed darting down narrow trails and in between saplings. They canchange direction at full speed, come to a full stop instantaneously, and leap onto and over thingsin excess of six feet high. From a stationary start standing below and abreast of a 5 foot terracethey can leap, turn and land on the terrace with their legs straight, as if no energy was expendedto make the jump.When at play, either being chased by other dogs, or simply running for exercise, they will run ina figure eight, leaning into the turns like a motorcycle racer so that they can maintain their momentum and speed or actually accelerate through the turns. They can easily leap 12-15 feetgetting about 3 feet off the ground. They are effortless runners and when the temperatures are inthe lower 50’s never seem to tire or pant.These dogs range in height from 19-21 inches at the shoulder and weigh between 38-48 pounds.They are tri-color (white, black and tan) and usually have some ticking on the forelegs or head.Their skin on the belly will actually be different colored patches, but the color of the skin patchdoes not match nor influence the hair color. The ears are short, similar to a greyhound but themuzzle is shorter with strong jaws. The jaws can lock and the dog can be lifted off the groundwhile clutching a rope. The jaws have no difficulty supporting the body weight of the dog for 30-45 seconds. When lifted the dog’s body goes rigid, all the muscles tense to help take theweight off of the jaw. After 15 to 20 second the Kings Island Terrier will begin to move its bodyin a sinuous snapping motion to attempt to break the rope free. Only after several unsuccessfulattempts will the terrier relax its jaws and drop. Their tail resembles that of a beagle or harrier.It is long and thin and tipped white at the top. When working in tall grasses the tail is curledover the back and raised high, like a flag, making it easier to follow. In the woods and whilerunning at top speeds the tail straightens out for the first 4 inches or so as it leaves the body, hasa slight downward kink in it and then is predominantly straight. The tail is used for balancewhen turning at high speed, and actually moves in a circular motion when slowing down.  The Kings Island Terrier should always be leashed unless trained and working in fields or in anenclosed dog exercise area. They have the ability to lower their center of gravity when strainingto smell something while on a leash and can become immoveable to even a 225 pound man.They will pull a smaller individual anywhere they want to go. When they are playing with other dogs, or are outside exercising they have a very low food motivation, so simply carrying treatswith you will not bring them back to you. Good complete training is imperative for you to trustthat they will return to you when called.Kings Island Terriers are very smart and easily trained. The recognize pack hierarchy so becertain to impress upon them your alpha position. They love to play hard and they love to sleephard, covered up with a blanket. Once asleep they do not move much. They have been known tocrawl up into an adult’s lap and lay down with their head on the adult’s shoulder and stretchedout with their hind quarters in the lap and not move for hours.As with most dogs, they respond very well to routine: getting fed at the same time every day;going outside at the same time every day; and especially going on a walk or getting exercised atthe same time every day. They have been known to vocalize (not bark, see above) when theythink you are skipping their walk. The exercise is vitally important to the healthy developmentof the individual animal. These animals need exercise daily. Their leg muscles will be very tautand rigid when they are alert and yet soft and loose when they are relaxed or sleeping.(Although the dog above is real (her name is Rose) she is a mix. The Kings Island Terrier is afalse breed name I have facetiously assigned her. The attributes describe her to this day, but thehistorical information is a farce. I hope you enjoyed reading. Thanks!)
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