Journal of International Relations - 1922 - 19.pdf

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  Problems in Pan Americanism by Samuel Guy InmanReview by: J. Fred Rippy The Journal of International Relations, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Apr., 1922), pp. 590-592Published by:Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29738529. Accessed: 04/10/2013 01:31 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of¬†content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. . http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 209.6.206.232 on Fri, 4 Oct 2013 01:31:39 AMAll use subject toJSTOR Terms and Conditions  590BOOKREVIEWSinternationalcooperationandtrust,thepreponderanceoftheevidenceisagainsttheformer.Whatmakesforitandsustainsitis,hethinks, somethinginthesrcinalnatureofman,the basictrendtowardcoercion, domination, force,whichoverrulesin?telligenceanddirectspolicyinpolitics,economicsandevensex.Thistrend,hebelieves,canbecontrolled,modified,andredirected.Therepressiveconductofgovernmentsand theothersinwartimeisthebestproofthattheir defence ofwar onthegroundthat youcan'tchangehumannature ispurelyadhoc,sincethatpolicyis itselfanattempttochangeit.Changeispossible,butitcancomeaboutonlythroughachangeofheart.Mr.AngelPspoliticalargumentis sound andinevitable.Hispsychologyis,however,somewhatnaive,and hispsychologicalprerequisitetointernationalismtoo muchlike counselofdespair.Achangeofsituationorofhabitorbothismuch easier toeffectthanachangeofheart,andjustaslikelytobringaboutthe de?siredresults.H.M.Kallen,NewSchoolforSocialResearch.ProblemsinPanAmericanism.BySamuelGuyInman.NewYork,GeorgeH.DoranCompany,1921.vii,415p.Theauthorof thisbookisnot,strictlyspeaking,astatesman,apoliticalscientist,or ahistorian;butheisamissionaryinthebroad,modernsenseofthat term. Hehas been connectedwithProtestantmissionaryeffortinLatinAmericaformanyyearsandheisnowsecretaryofacommitteewhichrepresentsanattemptonthepartoftheProtestantdenominationstocooperateintheHispanicAmericanfield.Hehas travelled muchinthecountriessouthoftheRioGrande,hehasmetandconversed withmanyoftheirleaders,hehasdippedinto theirliterature,wrestledwiththeirproblems,andacquiredanappreciationoftheirculture,theircharacter,andtheirmannerof life.Hehaswrittenthisvolumewiththeavowed intentionofcreatingabetter under?standingandpromotingawarmerfriendshipbetweenthetwoAmericas.He has statedthepurposeandscopeofhisbookasfollows:Inthefirstplace,aneffortis madeto havethereadershareintheauthor'sadmirationofandbeliefinthefutureoftheLatinAmericanpeople.Sinceitisunfair,however,indrawingupthebalancesheetofourfriendstohaveonlythe creditsidepresented,theoutstandingproblemsofoursouthernneighborsarealso This content downloaded from 209.6.206.232 on Fri, 4 Oct 2013 01:31:39 AMAll use subject toJSTOR Terms and Conditions  BOOKREVIEWS591given,largelyastheythemselveshavestatedthem.With thesefriendlycontactsestablished, historyisreviewedtoshowthatintheearlydays,bothin the North and in theSouth,therewerewarmreciprocaldesires for ContinentalSolidarity,incarnatedinSimon Bolivarof the South andHenryClayof theNorth. ButtheMexicanWarstartedacurrentofsuspicion,which theSpanishAmerican Warand the extensionofNorthAmerican controloverthe Caribbeancountriesdevelopedinto hatred. The MonroeDoctrineisshowntohave been well receivedinLatinAmerica;reasonsforlater dislikeofitaregiven,aswellastheplacetheSouthernAmericans wouldlike toseethedoctrineoccupytoday,in viewofthenewinternational situationdevelopedbytheWorldWar.TheSignificanceofthe variousPanAmericanConferences,fromPanamain1826toWashingtonin1916,is discussed andtheradicalchangesbroughtaboutbytheWorldWarinthe wholeproblemof Inter-AmericanFriendshiparestudied.Nextaredis?cussedtwooutstandingquestions,withouttheunderstandingofwhichnoonecanhaveadeep appreciationof thepresentstatusofAmerican Relations. Thesearetheproblemsconnectedwiththeinterventionof theUnitedStatesin the affairs ofthesmallcountriesof theCaribbeanand theresultantgrowthoftheinfluentialschoolofPanLatinists,formedbytheleadingwriters ofthe South whoarestronglyopposedtothe Pan Ameri?canists.FinallyaneffortismadetopointoutafewpracticalstepsthatNorth AmericansmighttaketoovercomethehandicapsofpastmistakesandmisunderstandingsandbuildupatrueAmericanfriendshipinwhichboth those oftheNorth andthoseof the Southshall beunitedin themotto,suggested byanArgen?tinepresident, America forHumanity. Since thebookiswrittenbyaNorth American forNorthAmeri?cans,therecognizedrightofonetocriticise thoseofhisownhouse?hold has been usedfreely.If Ihavepresentedherelargelytheblame attachedtoNorthAmericans for theinharmonyof thepast,it isnotbecauseit wouldnot beeasytoshowthe blamelyingatthedoor ofourneighbors.Butothershave donethat,sometimesadnauseam.Ithereforeprefertohelpusmagnifythegoodqualitiesofourneighborsandscrutinizecarefullyourownbadqualitiesasthebestpolicyforbuildingupinternational,asitis forbuildinguppersonalfriend?ships.(Foreword,pp.v-vi.)Mr. Inman has written for those Americans who residenorthofthe RioGrandeandtheywilldowellto read his book. Hisknowledgeofcontemporycurrents,opinions,and conditions inHispanicAmerica isunusualforaNorth American.Ifheoftenreveals themissionary bent,the scientificstudent willknowhowtomakedueallowance,for Inmandoesnotsailunderfalsecolors.He isabsolutelyfrank, intenselyearnest,andgenerallyunpreju?dicedandfairlyaccuratewhendealingwith historicalmatters. THEJOURNALOFINTERNATIONALRELATIONS,VOL.12,NO.4,1922 This content downloaded from 209.6.206.232 on Fri, 4 Oct 2013 01:31:39 AMAll use subject toJSTOR Terms and Conditions  592BOOKREVIEWSThe mostconspicuousdefectsofhisbookarehisfailure todis?tinguishclearlybetweenHispanicAmericanismand Pan Ameri?canism;hisfailuretoappreciatethestrengthofthePanHispanicmovement andtogivesufficientemphasistothe anti-YankeepropagandaoftheEuropeannations,particularlytheFrench,theSpanish,and theGermans;and his inaccuraciesandneglectofproperforminbibliographicalmatters.Perhapsitshouldbenoted,also,that his viewofthe MexicanWaris not inharmonywith thefindingsof the most recentscholarlyresearchinthatfield.ItmaybebestfromMr. Inman'sviewpointnot totalktoomuch about this sideofthematter,butitwouldbe hard toprovethatthatwar wasthepieceofpure,unmitigatedaggressionwhichherepresentsittobe;andifMr.Inman shouldinvestigatethecontemporaryHispanicAmericanreactiontothewarhemightbesurprisedattheresultsof hisinquiry.J.FredRippy,University of Chicago. This content downloaded from 209.6.206.232 on Fri, 4 Oct 2013 01:31:39 AMAll use subject toJSTOR Terms and Conditions
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