CIBJO Precious Metals Book 2010-1

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© CIBJO 2010. All rights reserved. PRECIOUS METALS COMMISSION 2010-1 2010 – 1 2010-5-14 CIBJO/PRECIOUS METALS CIBJO/Precious Metals Commission THE PRECIOUS METALS BOOK Precious Metals – Terminology & Classification © CIBJO 2010. All rights reserved. PRECIOUS METALS COMMISSION 2010-1 Foreword ………………………………………………………………………………………………iv Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………vi 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.4. 5.5. 5.6. 5.7. 5.8. 5.9. Scope …………………………………………………………………………………………..1 Normativ
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   © CIBJO 2010. All rights reserved. PRECIOUS METALS COMMISSION 2010-1 2010 – 1 2010-5-14CIBJO/PRECIOUS METALSCIBJO/Precious Metals Commission THE PRECIOUS METALS BOOK Precious Metals – Terminology & Classification   © CIBJO 2010. All rights reserved. PRECIOUS METALS COMMISSION 2010-1 Foreword ………………………………………………………………………………………………ivIntroduction……………………………………………………………………………………………vi1. Scope …………………………………………………………………………………………..12. Normative references ……………………………………………………………………….13. Classification of materials ………………………………………………………………….14. Normative Clauses …………………………………………………………………………..15. Terms and definitions………………………………………………………………………..15.1. Precious metals……………………………………………………………………………….15.2. Precious metal alloy………………………………………………………………………….15.3. Precious metal article………………………………………………………………………..15.4. Fineness………………………………………………………………………………………..25.5. Standard of fineness…………………………………………………………………………25.6. Precious metal coating/plating…………………………………………………………….25.7. Base metals……………………………………………………………………………………25.8. Weight of Precious Metal……………………………………………………………………25.9. Colour of Precious Metals…………………………………………………………………..25.10. This CIBJO standard does not apply to…………………………………………………..25.11. Fineness’ applied under this CIBJO standard…………………………………………..25.12. Tolerance………………………………………………………………………………………35.13. Use of solder………………………………………………………………………………..…35.14. Use of working base metal parts…………………………………………………………..45.15. Use of non-metallic substances for filling flatware and hollow-ware………………45.16. Coating of precious metal articles………………………………………………………...55.17. Marking of precious metal articles ………………………………………………………..7ii   © CIBJO 2010. All rights reserved. PRECIOUS METALS COMMISSION 2010-1 Appendix 1 CIBJO Countries who have not responded to Questionnaire – Information takenfrom IAAO 9…………………………………………………………………………………………….9Appendix 2 Supporting Standards - Internationally recognised precious metal standards inrelation to the jewellery, watch and silverware industries (non-exhaustive)……………..20References……………………………………………………………………………………………24Index…………………………………………………………………………………………………...25iii   © CIBJO 2010. All rights reserved. PRECIOUS METALS COMMISSION 2010-1 Foreword CIBJO is the French acronym for the C onfédération I nternationale de la B ijouterie, J oaillerie, O rfèvrerie, des Diamants, Perles et Pierres, which translates as the InternationalConfederation of Jewellery, Silverware, Diamonds, Pearls and Stones (normally shortened tothe International Jewellery Confederation). Founded in 1926 as BIBOAH, a Europeanorganisation whose mission was to represent and advance the interests of the jewellery tradein Europe, it was reorganised in 1961 and renamed CIBJO, in 2009 it was once againreorganized and officially named “CIBJO, The World Jewellery Confederation”. Today CIBJO,which is domiciled in Switzerland, is a non-profit confederation of national and internationaltrade associations including commercial organisations involved in the jewellery supply chain. Itnow has members from countries representing all five continents of the world. CIBJO printedits first deliberations on terminology and trade practices in 1968.It is the task of CIBJO to record the accepted trade practices and nomenclature for the industrythroughout the world. The records of the trade practices complement existing fair tradelegislation of a nation or in the absence of relevant national laws they can be considered astrading standards. In countries where laws or norms exist, which conflict with the laws, normsor trade practices in other countries, CIBJO will support the national trade organizations toprevent trade barriers developing. The purpose of CIBJO is to encourage harmonization,promote international co-operation within the jewellery industry, consider issues which are ofconcern to the trade worldwide and to communicate proactively with members. Foremostamongst these the aim is to protect consumer confidence in the industry. CIBJO pursues all ofthese objectives through informed deliberation and by reaching decisions in accordance withits Statutes. CIBJO relies upon the initiative of its members to support and implement itsstandards, and to protect the trust of the public in the industry.The work of CIBJO is accomplished through Committees, Commissions and Sectors.Committees and Commissions consider standards for use in the jewellery supply chain.Sectors represent levels of trade in the jewellery industry. Sectors and commissions advise theExecutive Committee on current trade practices and issues that affect the jewellery industry.Three independent sectors exist within the confederation:Sector A - The Products SectorSector B - The Supply chain SectorSector C - The Service SectorThe Executive Committee may appoint Commissions that consider detailed issues. At presentthese are:Coloured StoneDiamondEthicsGemmologicalPearl iv
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