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Change is changing. It is loud and noisy, chaotic and demanding. In dynamic work situations, change programs are a continuous stream of multiple projects running concurrently and demanding constant attention as part of everyday business. For a change program to be credible and have a critical impact, the change leader needs to ensure that the intervention connects on a human level. The question, therefore, is not whether a leader needs to instigate organization change but how change can be led in a way that manages the consequences of change and delivers a favorable outcome. This article reviews the roles and tasks of the OD practitioner as a change leader and the use of self in the change process.
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  1   1 ©   Business Expert Press 978-1-63157-993-6 (2018)   Expert Insights www.businessexpertpress.com Leading Change and the Use of Self  Organization Development in Practice Carrie Foster Abstract: Change is changing. It is loud and noisy, chaotic and demanding. In dynamic work situations, change programs are a continuous stream of multiple projects running concurrently and demanding constant attention as part of everyday business. For a change program to  be credible and have a critical impact, the change leader needs to ensure that the intervention connects on a human  level. The question, therefore, is not whether a leader needs to instigate organization change but how change can be led in a way that manages the consequences of change and delivers a favorable outcome. This article reviews the roles and tasks of the OD practitioner as a change leader and the use of self in the change process. Keywords: Change, Group dynamics, Organization development, Power, Self as instrument, Systems theory, Use of self  I NTRODUCTION The purpose of this article is to review the organization development (OD) practitioner’s role as a change leader and the use of self in the change process. This includes a review of how the change leaders’ own development  journey enables OD practitioners to operate in dynamic work situations, which results in credibility for the change program and the ability to connect on a human  level in order to deliver a critical impact through presence. This article will also provide a brief overview of the roles and tasks of OD practitioners, leading to a conversation about the concept of “self as instrument” and what the “use of self” means in theory and practice. Leading change and the use of self are in many ways the  basic requirements for a successful practice of OD in an Carrie Foster  specializes in the facilitation of coaching, people management, and organization development (OD) interventions that deliver added value and a measurable ROI to bottom-line performance. As a proven commercial OD practitioner, executive coach, practicing academic, and published author with a successful commercial career covering FMCG, industrial, manufacturing, and professional services, she has a track record of providing OD and coaching programs across the United Kingdom, Europe, Russia, and the Middle East that have met both individual and business needs.  ©   Business Expert Press 978-1-63157-993-6 (2018)   Expert Insights www.businessexpertpress.com Leading Change and the Use of Self  2 organization and be of interest to anyone who is planning to develop a career in OD.It is probably pertinent to begin this article by exploring the concept of change. Many articles cover change management, change leadership, change methods, but what is change? What is being managed and led that needs a methodology? Change, in the organizational sense, means something being altered, or made different. It could be explained as a shift, transformation, or transition that moves the organization from where it was to where it will be in the future. Change from this perspec- tive is neither good nor bad, it just is a process that is occurring. The outcomes of change are what makes it good or bad,  but change happens replacing what was prior to what will be. This is an important point to remember when considering the idea of leading change. In many ways, it could be argued that the axiom “change is inevitable” is true because nothing stands still, even the permanency of rock will change with the shifting sands of time. Therefore, it is not so much change that someone leads, but rather the need for someone to lead in order that change delivers favorable outcomes that occur as a consequence of change. It is these con- sequences of change that are important to those experiencing change, not the fact that change is happening.What is perhaps most interesting in any foray into the world of change is to understand how change itself is changing. From an organizational perspective, change appears never ending, as if the very act of change is now not something that creeps up on us unannounced but is instead  loud and noisy, chaotic, and demanding. It screams at business leaders, seeking attention, urging radical responses and immediate solutions to complex problems. Change programs are endemic within organizational life; they are no longer huge transformation projects demanding special attention for a period of time. Instead, change programs are a constant stream of multiple projects running concurrently demanding attention constantly as part of everyday business. There is no let up, no escape from, and no respite. Change has in many ways become ordinary, while at the same time the extraordinary level of change that is taking place in organiza-tions, politics, society, and the world is  breathtaking and even alarming when you stand back and really observe the frenetic pace of it.There are many reasons for the shift in how and why change happens. Our world is no longer simple and there is no normal. Like many of the conundrums of the Digital economy, we no longer know what is cause and what is effect, only that the causes are many and the effects profound. Globalization has accelerated, although many commentators would note that in recent years it too has changed, and perhaps we are entering a period of de-globalization. Although perhaps not,  because technology has stripped the world of time and distance barriers, and meant that geography is almost irrelevant when it comes to trade. An organization doesn’t have to be a large multinational  behemoth to trade globally, an individual working from their iPad in café can trade across the world with little difficulty. The current Brexit negotiations between the UK and EU are perhaps indicative of the complexities of borders and trade,  but this won’t prevent the entrepreneurs and internet gurus from going about their business. Therefore, change isn’t a simple mathematical problem with a solution, which can be simply calculated  by logic. There are so many intricate networks, and networks within networks that systems, processes, and policies that gave so much certainty to managing change in years past, are no longer easy to understand in terms of how changing one aspect will impact something else. There is no logical flow even in structural and technical systems. Traditional para-digms of organization design are moving  ©   Business Expert Press 978-1-63157-993-6 (2018)   Expert Insights www.businessexpertpress.com  3 Leading Change and the Use of Self away from hierarchical structures that impose strictures on the change capac-ity of employees. The shift in Organi-zational Design is toward an agile and flexible form, which allows for coopera-tion, collaboration, and full engagement  by all organizational actors. The bound-aryless nature of life and work has meant that change is invading every aspect of our human life, whether in our roles as employees or in our life as consumers. We cannot possibly keep up with all that change is throwing at us. In technology for example, the change is so rapid, the issue is that things are becoming obsolete  before they have had a chance to take root. The same is true in organizational  life. No sooner has one change project finished and people pack away the proj-ect files, than another round of change  begins. There is no time to catch breath, to take stock and decide whether the effort and investment made was actually worthwhile and useful. Summary Points  ■ Change in the organizational sense, means something being altered, or made different.  ■ The outcomes of change are what makes it good or bad.  ■ Change itself is changing. W HERE  C HANGE  H APPENS Change usually costs organizations money, productivity, efficiency, and quite often employee engagement. That change happens is not under dispute, but where change hap-pens is also important. There is a symbiotic relationship between change that happens within the organization, and change that happens outside it. It could be argued that organizations determine societal change. If Facebook hadn’t grown in size and influence then the changes in our society wrought by its presence causing millions to be in the thrall of social media would doubtless exist. It could be argued that introduction of the iPhone by Apple in 2007 would not have led to our reliance on mobile devices, and the rise of apps. There is little doubt that we would not have barriers at the train stations that can read mobile tickets, mobile banking apps or Apple Pay without the popularity of iPhone. At the same time organizations are equally affected by the changes in our soci-ety. The shifts in demographics, women in the workplace, migration, education, and occupation levels all impact what products and services are in demand and therefore produced and sold. For example, changing styles, fashions, and consumer preferences have led to a rise in the on-the-go products and services available in the marketplace and working mothers and busier lives have resulted in the reintroduction of grocery to home deliveries. In this respect, some of the new is familiar as if we are reinventing the wheel, or at least the delivery round,  but in other ways it is completely different. Inventions and innovation go hand in hand as needs and wants shift and morph. As demands are met, new needs arise. The workplace itself, and changing needs of the workforce, have also been responsible for change. For the first time in history there are four generations working side by side in the workplace. This creates tension and opportunity in regard to the needs of each generation and demands for different working conditions, benefits, and career opportunities are thrown together. This wrangling of knowledge, experience, and energy in a single office building brings with it a unique opportunity to tap into change agency from across the ages. There are those who have been there, done it, and  bought the T-shirt, who have seen change succeed and change fail. Who have felt the call of change from birth to an age where many would have retired, and found within it patterns that are familiar and dependable.  Alongside them work those who are the  bridging generation, born in an age where computers were not yet common, but  brought into common usage. Adopters and innovators, who have taken the baton of innovation and swift change and run with it, familiar and unfamiliar with the changes
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